Connecticut

  • February 26, 2024

    MetaBirkins NFT Maker Tells 2nd Circ. 'Artwork' Is Protected

    The creator of the MetaBirkins non-fungible token collection has told the Second Circuit that his use of the iconic Hermès bag's name and likeness was relevant to his artwork but said the New York court misapplied the test of whether it was protected speech when it found that the digital assets infringed on the fashion house's trademarks.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    Gartner, Hackett Settle Trade Secrets, Employee-Poaching Suit

    Consulting firm Gartner Inc. and its rival The Hackett Group Inc. have settled a trade secrets fight that saw each company accuse the other of unfair trade practices, according to a filing dismissing the case from Connecticut federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Lyft Can't Escape Claims Its Driver Failed To Protect Teenager

    A Connecticut federal judge won't let Lyft out of a suit alleging one of its drivers drove a 14-year-old out of state to a location where she was sexually abused, saying the girl's family is allowed to amend its complaint.

  • February 26, 2024

    Conn. Client Pans Firm's Late Reveal Of Prior Email Mess

    An optometrist who claims a fraudster infiltrated her lawyer's email system and tricked her into wiring $90,586 to an incorrect account has challenged the firm's "very late post-trial disclosure" of five pages of emails about an alleged earlier incident, saying the messages are relevant to her own case.

  • February 26, 2024

    Conn. Homeowners Say Toll Bros. Botched Senior Community

    A planned community hit construction firm Toll Brothers with a breach of contract suit in Connecticut state court, alleging 67 townhomes, six apartment buildings and a clubhouse were built or improved with dozens of major defects the builder failed to fix.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Justices OK $2.9M Cut To Power Co.'s Cost Recovery

    Connecticut's highest court on Friday held that state energy regulators properly trimmed a power company's annual cost recovery bid by more than $2.86 million, agreeing with a lower court that it was not arbitrary or capricious to decline to pass the expense to customers.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Seek Time For Justices' Input On Mexico's Suit

    Gunmakers facing a recently revived lawsuit looking to hold them liable for firearms trafficking and cartel violence in Mexico on Friday asked a Boston federal judge to stand down and halt proceedings so the U.S. Supreme Court can have a chance to review the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Nixes McCarter & English Client's Relief Bid In Fee Row

    A Connecticut federal judge rejected a bid for Second Circuit relief from a supplement company that lost a billing battle with its former lawyers at McCarter & English LLP, concluding Friday that the Connecticut Supreme Court should offer guidance on whether state law allows punitive damages awards in contract disputes.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Attys Agree To Arbitrate Their Twin Conversion Claims

    Two Connecticut attorneys who sued each other over defamation, secretly accepting home improvement projects as payment for legal services and neglecting business responsibilities at a joint firm they agreed to dissolve in 2021, have dropped their dueling state court claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    Red Sox Network Exec Says 18 Mos. Enough For Billing Fraud

    A former vice president with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games argued Thursday that he should spend no more than 18 months in federal prison after a jury convicted him of bilking his former employer through a phony invoice scheme.

  • February 22, 2024

    Penny Stock Co. CEO Must Pay $473K Over Fraud Claims

    A Connecticut federal judge granted in part the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's motion for final judgment in a securities fraud suit against the CEO of a penny stock company, finding that a less severe punishment than requested is appropriate due to the CEO's financial situation.

  • February 22, 2024

    Conn. Embezzler Gets 2 Years For $1M Mom-And-Pop Ripoff

    The former office manager for a family-owned construction business in Connecticut must serve 24 months in prison for stealing nearly $1 million from her employer through a yearslong embezzlement scheme and failing to pay taxes on the money, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 22, 2024

    Conn. AG Defends $10M Remedy Bid Against Nursing School

    The state of Connecticut on Thursday defended its request to collect a $10 million litigation placeholder from a shuttered nursing school, arguing state regulators were correct to take action against the troubled institution despite the school's strenuous assertions that the attorney general's office is wrong on many facts.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fired Exec Says Conn. Hospital Booted Her For Her Age

    A former Waterbury Hospital executive is suing her ex-employer in Connecticut federal court, saying it posted her job on a career site while she was on medical leave and then fired her so the CEO could "replace her with someone younger and more attractive."

  • February 22, 2024

    Kwok Owed Records About CCP Targeting, Judge Says

    A New York federal judge ordered the Justice Department to hand over evidence it possessed of the Chinese Communist Party's targeting of bankrupt and jailed Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok, but didn't require the government to hand over other evidence sought by Kwok about Chinese government targeting of his alleged victims.

  • February 22, 2024

    Fire Product Makers Try To Move PFAS Suit To Fed. Court

    A group of chemical companies that produce fire suppressants are seeking to move to federal court a suit brought by the Connecticut attorney general looking to rein in the use of PFAS chemicals, saying they are entitled to a federal forum to exercise a "government contractor" defense.

  • February 22, 2024

    Feds Can't Offset Nuclear Cleanup Bill With Trusts' Earnings

    The U.S. Department of Energy wasn't able to convince the U.S. Court of Federal Claims that nuclear utilities' high earnings on nuclear decommissioning funds should erase their $149 million damages claim against the department for delayed nuclear waste cleanup, according to an opinion made public this week.

  • February 22, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Sanctions Bid In 'Fabricated' Infant Death Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge is worried about the possible consequences of sanctioning parties who brought what one company called a "fabricated" product liability lawsuit blaming it and Target Corp. for a baby's death, expressing concern Thursday that any factual findings could interfere with the plaintiffs' right to a jury trial.

  • February 21, 2024

    39 AGs Call For Federal Pharmacy Benefit Manager Reform

    The list of critics of pharmacy benefit managers continues to grow as nearly 40 attorneys general have thrown their weight behind a trio of federal bills they say would force more transparency into an "opaque" industry that has "been a cause of rising drug prices."

  • February 21, 2024

    Justices Squabble Over Emergency Review Of EPA Smog Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court's liberal wing denounced during oral argument Wednesday their colleagues' decision to consider the merits of four related emergency requests to prevent the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from implementing a plan to reduce cross-state pollution without first getting lower court input.

  • February 21, 2024

    Salesman Accused Of AI Misuse Must Hand Over Co. Docs

    A Connecticut salesman who allegedly used the artificial intelligence application Otter to record company calls must return any of his former employer's internal documents that are still in his possession and swear that he no longer has any of the material at issue in a trade secrets lawsuit, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 21, 2024

    Conn. Court Pauses Refund Plan For Ex-Nursing Students

    Over the objections of the Connecticut attorney general, a judge has temporarily halted a state agency's plan to refund some tuition money that students paid to the now-shuttered nursing school Stone Academy, siding with a proposed class of affected students who want to avoid waiving their legal rights in order to receive the payments.

  • February 21, 2024

    Connecticut Atty To Settle Client's Suit Over Cash Mishap

    A Connecticut lawyer who allegedly sent part of his client's $286,000 real estate transaction to a purported fraudster posing as that client with a fake email address has come to a "tentative settlement" to resolve the malpractice suit against him, new state court filings show.

Expert Analysis

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

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    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

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    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

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