Connecticut

  • January 26, 2024

    Conn. Firm Accuses Copyright Case Foe Of Filing False Docs

    A Connecticut firm embroiled in a yearslong, multistate copyright battle over images on its website has told a California federal judge that the stock photo website accusing it of infringement submitted false and inaccurate information to the U.S. Copyright Office.

  • January 26, 2024

    Conn. Justices Won't Boost Car Buyer's $11K Lemon Award

    A used car buyer cannot recover more than the $11,000 that a jury awarded her in a lemon case even though she revoked her acceptance of the problematic BMW and the outcome left her tens of thousands of dollars in the red, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Friday.

  • January 26, 2024

    Off The Bench: McMahon Sued, 'Rock' Victory, USC Feels Heat

    In this week's Off The Bench, WWE founder Vince McMahon has been sued for sexual abuse and trafficking, "The Rock" reclaimed his name, and USC defended its claim that college athletes aren't employees. If you were on the sidelines over the past week, Law360 is here to clue you in on the biggest sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • January 26, 2024

    High Court Asked To Review FDA Flavored E-Cig Denials

    Vape maker Magellan Technology Inc. is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to review the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's denial of its application to market flavored e-cigarettes, saying there's a circuit split on whether the FDA gave companies proper notice of the criteria it would use.

  • January 26, 2024

    Ex-Allied World Exec Denies Feds' $1.5M Fraud Charges

    A former vice president at Allied World National Insurance Co. who was recently ordered to pay $2.9 million to the company in its civil case accusing him of embezzlement has pled not guilty to federal prosecutors' 10 wire fraud charges against him in his parallel criminal proceedings.

  • January 25, 2024

    Chemours, 3M And Others Hit With Connecticut PFAS Suits

    Calling PFAS chemicals a "toxic menace to human health," Connecticut Attorney General William Tong on Thursday became the latest state law enforcer to seek penalties and environmental reimbursements over consumer products and firefighting foams containing "forever chemicals," filing twin lawsuits targeting Chemours Co., 3M Co. and more than two dozen others.

  • January 25, 2024

    9th Circ. Urged To Affirm Pause On Idaho Abortion Travel Ban

    States including Washington, Arizona and California have urged the Ninth Circuit to affirm a lower court's temporary pause on an Idaho law making it a criminal offense to help minors travel out of state to receive abortions, calling it an "unconstitutional regime" that doesn't square with U.S. Supreme Court precedent.

  • January 25, 2024

    Conn. Judge OKs State Oversight Of Defunct Nursing School

    The state of Connecticut has inked a deal to supervise assets held by a shuttered for-profit nursing school accused of scamming its students in exchange for the government withdrawing its request for receivership, court documents show.

  • January 25, 2024

    Conn. Adultery Law Voids Diplomat's $582M Win, Ex-Wife Says

    Connecticut law should have barred a Kuwaiti ambassador from suing his ex-wife in a fraud case that netted a judgment of more than $582 million because the claims arose from allegations of adultery, the Connecticut Appellate Court heard Thursday.

  • January 25, 2024

    Vince McMahon Abused, Trafficked Ex-WWE Staffer, Suit Says

    Vince McMahon pressured a former World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. employee into sex in exchange for a job, pushed her into sexual relations with other WWE executives and employees, circulated explicit photos and videos of her inside and outside the company, then forced her out with a nondisclosure agreement and millions in hush money, the ex-staffer alleged in a lawsuit filed Thursday in Connecticut federal court.

  • January 25, 2024

    Black Amtrak Conductor Rejected From Union Jobs, Suit Says

    A Black Amtrak conductor was repeatedly passed over for committee assignments by her union in favor of less experienced white men and harassed by a superior after she complained, according to a suit filed in Connecticut federal court.

  • January 24, 2024

    Aerospace Contractor Inks $7.4M Deal In Conn. No-Poach Suit

    An aerospace subcontractor accused alongside Raytheon Technologies Corp.'s Pratt & Whitney division and others of conspiring to restrict hiring will pay $7.4 million to resolve the antitrust claims, according to a notice filed Wednesday in Connecticut federal court that indicates three other deals are also on the horizon.

  • January 24, 2024

    5 Universities Cut $104.5M Deal In Student Aid-Fixing Suit

    A group of students is asking an Illinois federal judge to sign off on a $104.5 million deal with five universities in a proposed antitrust class action claiming that 17 universities conspired to limit student aid.

  • January 24, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Alex Jones Creditors Can Vote On Competing Ch. 11 Plans

    Right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and certain creditors in his Chapter 11 case can finally vie for claimants' votes on their rival proposals for insolvency ahead of a confirmation hearing in March, after the parties resolved objections to the other's plan documents Wednesday.

  • January 24, 2024

    Conn. Atty Must Withdraw Billing Notices To Rival's Clients

    Stamford, Connecticut-based intellectual property attorney Paul D. Greeley must send corrective messages to a competitor's clients after his firm accidentally sent them allegedly improper billing statements, a Connecticut federal judge ordered Wednesday.

  • January 24, 2024

    Workers' Break Suit Paused To Finalize Deal With Athena

    Two workers' suit claiming Athena Health Care failed to provide them with 30-minute meal breaks will be on hold, a Connecticut federal judge said, as the parties finalize a settlement they recently reached.

  • January 24, 2024

    Woman Says Mortgage Co. Made Her Contact Abusive Ex

    A Connecticut woman accused a mortgage servicer of violating the Equal Credit Opportunity Act by forcing her to interact with her abusive ex-partner in order to get him to sign loan modification agreements that were needed to stave off foreclosure on her home.

  • January 24, 2024

    Ex-Execs Can't Bring $300M Fraud Suit For Metal Co., Judge Told

    Two former executives of a major metals trading company cannot bring derivative claims tied to an alleged $300 million stock swindle because they failed to satisfy share ownership requirements under Delaware law, an attorney for the defendants told a Connecticut state judge Wednesday.

  • January 24, 2024

    5 Firms Get $3.4M For Scoring Securities Fraud Deal

    A Connecticut state court judge has awarded five law firms nearly $3.2 million in legal fees and close to $215,000 in costs after attorneys spent nearly a decade litigating a $6.75 million securities fraud case across several federal and state trial and appellate court dockets on behalf of an investment banking firm.

  • January 23, 2024

    2nd Circ. Partially Revives No Surprises Act Suit

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday partially revived a challenge from a New York surgeons' office to a federal surprise billing law, saying the physicians can amend their case in lower court to reflect arguments concerning insurers they made for the first time on appeal.

  • January 23, 2024

    50 Cent Can Look At Ex-Liquor Boss's Assets For $7M Award

    A Connecticut bankruptcy judge is allowing rapper Curtis "50 Cent" Jackson's cognac company to examine assets belonging to its former brand manager, a move that could help the artist behind "In Da Club" recover a roughly $7 million judgment for claims accusing the now-insolvent ex-employee of stealing from the business.

  • January 23, 2024

    Crypto VC Lenders Want Conn. Securities Suit Kept Alive

    A group of lenders who accused Digital Currency Group in Connecticut federal court of misleading them through a "sham transaction" with a subsidiary argued this week that the crypto venture capital firm's motion to have their case dismissed overlooked crucial allegations, misrepresented facts and relied on inapplicable legal precedents.

  • January 23, 2024

    Study Platform Told To Turn Over Copyright Data To University

     A federal magistrate judge ordered study aid platform Learneo Inc. to turn over any documents or data it has that could show that it failed to follow the Digital Millennium Copyright Act to a Connecticut university accusing it of stealing school resources and passing them off as its own.

  • January 23, 2024

    Teva Can't Escape Insurers' Copaxone Generic Delay Case

    A Vermont federal court has refused to toss a proposed class action from insurers accusing Teva Pharmaceuticals of delaying generic versions of multiple sclerosis treatment Copaxone but trimmed several claims under various state laws.

  • January 23, 2024

    ​​​​​​​'Two-Step' Bankruptcies Abuse Law, AGs Tell Justices

    Attorneys general from 24 states and the District of Columbia told the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that divisional mergers that manufacture jurisdiction for bankruptcy purposes shouldn't be allowed, writing in an amicus brief that Georgia-Pacific asbestos unit Bestwall employed the tactic to shield the parent from liability.

Expert Analysis

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Cases, Issues That May Shape The Intersection Of AI And IP

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    Courts dealing with the current, and likely growing, onslaught of intellectual property litigation concerning artificial intelligence will determine whether certain common forms of AI training constitute IP violations, while the government works to determine whether AI-generated output is itself protectable under the law, say Robert Hill and Kathryn Keating at Holland & Knight and Meghan Ryan at Southern Methodist University.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • What To Know About Calif.'s Cybersecurity Draft Regulations

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    If adopted, California’s recently proposed privacy regulations would require businesses already subject to the California Consumer Privacy Act to conduct new, independent audits of their cybersecurity programs, which could have a sweeping effect on companies operating in the state, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • State Privacy Laws: Not As Comprehensive As You May Think

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    As more U.S. states enact privacy laws, companies must be aware that these laws vary in scope and content, meaning organizations should take a stringent approach to compliance by considering notice, choice and data security obligations, among other requirements, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • Avoid Telehealth Pitfalls In A Post-Pandemic Environment

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    As federal and state governments roll out various changes to regulation of telehealth services, health practitioners should remain vigilant and ensure that necessary professional standards — such as proper note-taking and documentation — are not neglected in a remote environment, say attorneys at Kaufman Borgeest.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • FCRA Legislation To Watch For The Remainder Of 2023

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    If enacted, pending federal and state legislation may result in significant changes for the Fair Credit Reporting Act landscape and thus require regulated entities and practitioners to pivot their compliance strategies, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

  • Conn. Regulators Are Coming For Unlawful Cannabis Sales

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    Regulatory and enforcement efforts against unlicensed cannabis sales in Connecticut have been ramping up this year, so it behooves retailers to prioritize compliance with all relevant statutes, lest they attract unwelcome scrutiny, says Eric Del Pozo at Shipman & Goodwin.

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