Legal Ethics

  • April 08, 2024

    Ex-Paralegal Launches Whistleblower Suit Against NJ Firm

    An ex-paralegal at New Jersey personal injury law firm Brandon J. Broderick LLC says his former employer created an uncomfortable work place when he reported alleged ethical violations to management.

  • April 08, 2024

    Atty Can't Slip Willkie Partner's Suit Over NY Post Story

    A Connecticut federal judge has declined to toss a Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP partner's abuse of process case against a Constitution State attorney who allegedly orchestrated an unflattering New York Post article as retaliation for an underlying disqualification bid, ruling that the suit is not blocked by litigation privilege.

  • April 08, 2024

    Mo. Atty Loses Last-Ditch Bid To Dodge NC Tax Fraud Trial

    A St. Louis attorney lost a last-minute attempt to escape his upcoming tax fraud trial based on claims that the prosecution was never properly authorized, with a North Carolina federal judge finding that the government did mislead the court but nonetheless had the right stamp of approval.

  • April 08, 2024

    Trump Can't Move Hush Money Trial, NY Appeals Judge Says

    A New York appellate judge on Monday denied Donald Trump's request to halt his upcoming hush money trial due to what the former president cast as a hopelessly biased jury pool in Manhattan, as he awaited a hearing on his separate bid to lift a gag order.

  • April 05, 2024

    Higher Election Target For Colo. Judges Inches Ahead

    A proposed ballot initiative that would require Colorado state judges get 55% of votes to keep their seats, rather than the simple majority required currently, cleared another hurdle when the state Title Board approved the ballot's title and language.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Newman Pushes To Keep Suit Over Suspension Intact

    U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman urged a D.C. federal judge Friday to let her pursue a constitutional challenge to the law under which she has been suspended, and to reject her colleagues' contention that her case does not pass legal muster.

  • April 05, 2024

    Flat-Fee Representation Fuels Man's Bid To Avoid Execution

    As his execution date approaches on April 9, Brian Joseph Dorsey, who was sentenced to death for first-degree murder in Missouri, has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to find that his trial attorneys' flat-flee contracts resulted in inadequate legal representation that has left him doomed to die.

  • April 05, 2024

    Ex-Client Says NJ Atty To Blame For Shoddy Pandemic Deal

    A woman suing her former attorneys for allegedly forcing her into an unfavorable deal in a medical malpractice suit has urged a New Jersey state court not to dismiss claims against one of the attorneys, reiterating to the court that both attorneys were responsible for her botched case.

  • April 05, 2024

    Conn. Fraudulent Property Transfer Suit Against Atty Resolved

    A New York doctor and the real estate attorney and developer he accused of transferring his Fairfield, Connecticut, property to benefit a scammer have resolved a federal lawsuit, agreeing to quiet the title and dismiss all other causes of action, following the reported settlement of a separate state court action.

  • April 05, 2024

    Calif. Judge Faces Two New Ethics Charges

    A California state judge facing a plethora of ethics charges is now facing additional allegations related to his participation in an online debate and comments he made during a court hearing.

  • April 05, 2024

    Attys Ask 2nd Circ. To Affirm Ruling In Psychiatry Prof's Death

    Attorneys cleared of any wrongdoing in New York federal court in the death of renowned psychiatry professor Judith Brook in their capacity as court-appointed temporary guardians urged the Second Circuit this week to affirm a lower court's holding that temporary guardians are not state actors subject to federal jurisdiction.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Foley & Lardner Exit Bid From SEC Suit

    A request by Foley & Lardner LLP attorneys to stop representing a Malta-based registered investment adviser in a $75 million suit by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is hanging in the balance after a North Carolina federal judge expressed concerns about their exit holding up the case.

  • April 05, 2024

    Texas Justices Reverse Course In Atty Sex Tape Dispute

    The state's high court on Friday backpedaled on an earlier decision declining to intervene in a dispute between a woman and a Houston attorney she is suing over a video she says may contain child sexual abuse, agreeing to rehear her bid for relief from a court order governing the video.

  • April 05, 2024

    Reger Rizzo Hit With Race, Gender Bias Suit By Ex-Employee

    Reger Rizzo & Darnall LLP has been sued in Pennsylvania federal court by a former firm legal assistant alleging racial and sex discrimination, and claiming that a hostile, harassing and retaliatory work environment caused her to leave her job.

  • April 05, 2024

    NC High Court Snapshot: Law Firm Battles Defamation Suit

    The Supreme Court of North Carolina has a stacked calendar heading into spring arguments, from an appeal over Black-owned properties targeted for demolition to a law firm's attempt at dodging defamation claims over allegations of voter fraud.

  • April 05, 2024

    Beck Redden Beats Disbarred Atty's Texas Malpractice Suit

    A Texas federal judge granted Beck Redden LLP's request to end a malpractice suit against it from a disbarred attorney and former firm client who alleged the firm waived his right to a jury trial.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judge Won't Recuse Herself From Doctor's NBA Fraud Trial

    A Manhattan federal judge has refused to step away from the case of a Seattle doctor accused of participating in a scheme to defraud the National Basketball Association's health plan, saying there was "no basis" for his bid to oust her after he took issue with the trial schedule and what he described as systemic barriers.

  • April 05, 2024

    Wisconsin Bar Tweaks Diversity Definition Amid Bias Suit

    The State Bar of Wisconsin has erased a legal challenge related to its diversity clerkship program following a revision of its definition of diversity, though the federal case will continue over dues collections.

  • April 05, 2024

    Chinese Insurer Awarded Nearly $15M Over Hotel Theft Suit

    A California federal judge awarded a Chinese insurer nearly $15 million in damages after a man accused of conspiring to fraudulently claim ownership of New York City's JW Marriott Essex House Hotel and other luxury properties failed to appear in the action.

  • April 04, 2024

    9th Circ. Unconvinced Judge's Past Job Hurt Tesla Investor

    The Ninth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive claims brought by a short-seller accusing Tesla Inc. and CEO Elon Musk of using social media to artificially inflate the company's stock, ruling that the plaintiff wasn't prejudiced by a district judge's former employment with the predecessor of a firm that represented Tesla for a portion of the litigation.

  • April 04, 2024

    Young Thug Can't DQ Prosecutor Over Questions To Witness

    An Atlanta judge on Thursday denied a motion to disqualify the lead prosecutor in the racketeering trial against rapper Young Thug and five others after weighing claims that she had made herself a witness, according to defense counsel.

  • April 04, 2024

    Caterpillar 'Talking Out Both Sides,' Judge Says

    A Delaware federal judge chastised Caterpillar Inc. ahead of trial in a series of orders mostly siding with claims from a defunct construction equipment supplier accusing the company of pressuring an online auctioneer to break an important contract with the would-be competitor.

  • April 04, 2024

    Depo Conflicts Mean Pretrial Win In Malpractice Suit, Attys Say

    A Texas state court judge on Thursday said he needed to more closely review the prior deposition of a man who claimed his Houston-area property was flooded by Hurricane Harvey and Tropical Storm Imelda before deciding whether to grant a pretrial win to a law firm the man accused of botching his damage claim.

  • April 04, 2024

    John Eastman Says Inactive Status Hampers Livelihood

    Former Donald Trump attorney John Eastman asked the State Bar Court of California on Wednesday to delay placing him on inactive enrollment while he appeals the recommendation for his disbarment, saying he can't sustain the loss of his livelihood representing clients like Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene.

  • April 04, 2024

    NC Tax Fraud Trial Evidence Bids Get Lukewarm Reception

    A North Carolina federal judge on Thursday seemed reluctant to limit certain evidence against two attorneys and an insurance agent in their upcoming tax fraud trial, saying some of it seemed pertinent to the government's quest to prove intent but suspected other information might be construed by jurors as "petty."

Expert Analysis

  • How Judicial Privilege Shields Attys Facing Wiretap Violations

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    A recent ruling from the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania, as well as past rulings across the country, indicates that the judicial privilege is applicable to alleged violations of wiretapping laws, so attorneys presented with audio evidence beneficial to their case should not fear being sued, says David Scott at Kang Haggerty.

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Noncompetes Hold Atty Privilege Pitfalls For Health Industry

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    Providers negotiating with medical professionals bound by enforceable restrictive covenants must tread carefully due to not only risk of breaching physicians' covenants but also risk of wrongful conduct that pierces attorney-client privilege, says Scott O'Connell at Holland & Knight.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Opinion

    Guardrails Needed Against Politically Motivated Atty Discipline

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    As illustrated by revelations about disbarred attorney Tom Girardi’s influence, there is a need to revamp attorney discipline to protect the public, but any reforms to misconduct rules must also consider how bar-directed disciplinary hearings are increasingly used as a political weapon, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Groundbreaking Nev. Law May Alter Insurance Landscape

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    The Nevada Legislature recently passed a law prohibiting insurers from issuing liability policies with eroding limits provisions that has the potential to create massive shifts in the marketplace — and specifically in areas like professional liability, cyber, and directors and officers insurance, says Will Bennett at Saxe Doernberger.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Durham Hearing Shows Common Cross-Examination Errors

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    Trial attorneys can glean several key cross-examination lessons from the mistakes made by several members of the U.S. House of Representatives during a recent hearing on special counsel John Durham’s FBI probe, say Luke Andrews and Asha Laskar at Poole Huffman.

  • Opinion

    When Corporate Self-Disclosure Threatens Individuals' Rights

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    The prosecution of former Cognizant executives in New Jersey federal court demonstrates how the U.S. Department of Justice’s corporate enforcement policy can contravene the constitutional rights of individual defendants who are employed by cooperating companies, says Gideon Mark at the University of Maryland.

  • Pitfalls Of Attorney AI Use In Brief Prep Has Judges On Alert

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    Some lawyers are attempting to leverage generative artificial intelligence as a brief drafting tool, which may serve to greatly reduce the burden of motion practice, but several recent cases show that generative AI is not perfect and blind reliance on this tool can be very risky, say Matthew Nigriny and John Gary Maynard at Hunton.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

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