Legal Ethics

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Atty Didn't Go 'Rogue' In Pushing Club NDA, Court Told

    A former server suing a Trump Organization golf club over a nondisclosure agreement that she was allegedly illegally induced to sign by one of Donald Trump's lawyers has urged a New Jersey state court to keep her suit alive, arguing that the club's motion to dismiss relies on "absurd" arguments.

  • February 16, 2024

    Littler Hit With DQ Bid For Wielding Mistakenly Produced Doc

    Littler Mendelson PC has gained an "unfair advantage" and should be booted from defending a Florida pharmacy services company for using an inadvertently produced, privileged document in a deposition last week, a woman suing the company for whistleblower retaliation said.

  • February 16, 2024

    Trump Owes $355M For Fraud That 'Shocks The Conscience'

    A New York state judge on Friday found Donald Trump, his adult sons, his companies and longtime executives liable for a decadelong valuation fraud conspiracy, ordering the defendants to disgorge $364 million in ill-gotten gains to the state, plus interest, with the former president on the hook for the lion's share.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fulton DA DQ Hearing Wraps With Fight Over Privilege

    The evidentiary hearing in Georgia over whether Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis should be removed from the case against former President Donald Trump and his allies has concluded for the time being, a judge said Friday after nearly seven hours of testimony.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Official Wants Witnesses Barred From DC Ethics Case

    Jeffrey Clark, who was an assistant attorney general for the U.S. Justice Department under President Donald Trump, has asked a District of Columbia ethics panel to block fellow former DOJ officials from testifying in a disciplinary proceeding resulting from his alleged role in promoting the former president's bogus stolen election claims.

  • February 15, 2024

    Kirkland Fights Uphill To Get Atty's Info From 2 BigLaw Firms

    A California federal magistrate judge appeared skeptical Thursday of Kirkland & Ellis' bid to subpoena confidential personnel information from a former IP associate's prior employers Paul Hastings LLP and Fish & Richardson PC in Kirkland's defense against her discrimination suit, telling counsel the requests seem overbroad and "at best marginally relevant."

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Asks Justices To Give Time For DC Immunity Appeal

    Donald Trump made a final plea Thursday asking the U.S. Supreme Court to stay a D.C. Circuit panel's ruling that he is not immune from federal charges of interfering in the 2020 presidential election, slamming special counsel Jack Smith's bid to get on with the former president's trial.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-ArentFox Client Tentatively Denied Conflict Case Discovery

    A California state judge tentatively ruled on Thursday that government contractor Peraton Corp. cannot get discovery for ArentFox Schiff's work for a business rival around the time it represented Peraton, saying since the discovery bid relates to an arbitration provision in Peraton's retainer, what happened after it was inked is irrelevant.

  • February 15, 2024

    Atty Must Be Tried Alongside Ex-Hawaii DA, Feds Say

    Prosecutors have urged a federal judge not to sever a lawyer from a criminal case against former Honolulu top prosecutor Keith Kaneshiro and others, saying she was a "primary" facilitator of a prosecution-for-donations conspiracy.

  • February 15, 2024

    Baker McKenzie Can't Send Malpractice Suit To London

    An Illinois state appeals court has rejected a push by Chicago-based Baker McKenzie to transfer to London a legal malpractice suit accusing the international law firm of botching a client's bid to reacquire a coal mine in Russia, saying in a 2-1 decision that Cook County has an interest in deciding the case even if the alleged misconduct stems from attorneys in a Russian member firm.

  • February 15, 2024

    NJ Atty Beats Greater Damages Bid Over Hotel Project Loan

    A New Jersey attorney won't have to face an additional $9.5 million in damages in a suit over a mishandled escrow agreement related to the development of a luxury New Mexico hotel, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-Atty Who Lied To Grand Jury About Frauds Gets 6.5 Years

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced a disbarred lawyer to six and a half years in prison Thursday for his 14-year, $17 million real estate Ponzi scheme, for laundering insurance scam proceeds and for his "unheard of" step of lying to a grand jury.

  • February 15, 2024

    Reed Smith Wants To Shield Internal Probe In Bias Suit

    Reed Smith LLP urged a New Jersey federal judge Thursday to seal an internal investigation report as the firm fights a long-running age and racial discrimination suit brought by a former paralegal, arguing her pro-se motion to unseal the report was "untimely and largely nonsensical."

  • February 15, 2024

    Cole Scott Faces DQ Bid In Fla. Crash Suit Over Atty

    Cole Scott & Kissane PA should be booted from representing the defendants in a car wreck lawsuit because it failed to disclose that a firm attorney formerly represented the plaintiff in a different crash case that has become an issue in the current one, the plaintiff told a Florida federal court Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    4E Agent Floats Plan To Hand Disputed Atty Fees To Creditors

    The Chapter 11 agent for hand sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC has asked a Texas bankruptcy judge to approve a modified reorganization plan that would allow unsecured creditors to recover fees that Jackson Walker LLP may be forced to disgorge over an ethics scandal involving a former partner.

  • February 15, 2024

    LA Attorney Says The Barnes Firm Owes Him About $6M

    In litigation related to the now-defunct personal injury giant Cellino & Barnes, a California attorney is arguing that successor law firms defrauded him during severance negotiations and now owe him about $6 million.

  • February 15, 2024

    Stanford Prof Must Pay Atty Fees In Dropped Defamation Suit

    A Stanford University professor who sued critics of his renewable energy research must pay more than $500,000 in attorney fees despite dropping the litigation, the D.C. Court of Appeals ruled Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-Employer Blasts Lewis Brisbois Partner's Immunity Claim

    A Houston lawyer and his firm, Berg & Androphy, are urging a Texas state court to reject an attempt by a former employee and current partner with Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP to avoid $457,190 in potential sanctions for allegedly harassing Berg & Androphy with years of legal fights over back wages.

  • February 15, 2024

    Petition Watch: Classes, Litigation Changes & Fraud Theories

    The U.S. Supreme Court receives thousands of petitions for review each term, but only a few make the news. Here, Law360 looks at four petitions filed in the past three weeks that you might've missed, including questions over how courts should analyze class certification bids and regulations restricting specific speech for content-neutral reasons, whether plaintiffs must reestablish standing after amending lawsuits, and what constitutes fraud.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Prosecutor Blasts DQ Bid: 'Contrary To Democracy'

    Fulton County, Georgia, District Attorney Fani Willis delivered fiery testimony Thursday during a hearing seeking to have her office removed from the election interference case of Donald Trump and his allies, forcefully denying an improper relationship with a special prosecutor tapped for the high-profile case.

  • February 15, 2024

    Ex-McElroy Deutsch CFO Charged With $1.5M Theft From Firm

    McElroy Deutsch Mulvaney & Carpenter LLP's former chief financial officer has been hit with criminal charges in New Jersey state court alleging he embezzled more than $1.5 million from the firm over a five-year period in unauthorized compensation and company credit card charges for personal expenses, prosecutors said Thursday.

  • February 15, 2024

    1st Circ. Says Atty's Absence No Reason To Toss RICO Case

    The First Circuit has said a Boston federal judge's decision to dismiss a civil racketeering lawsuit after the plaintiff's counsel missed a hearing was an unwarranted rush to the "draconian sanction," which should be reserved for more extreme misconduct.

  • February 15, 2024

    Trump Gets March 25 Trial Date In NY Hush Money Case

    The Manhattan district attorney's hush money case against Donald Trump is on track to be the first of the former president's four criminal matters to go to trial, after a state judge on Thursday denied his motion to dismiss the charges and confirmed a March 25 date for jury selection.

  • February 14, 2024

    Telecom Confusion Caused $56M Damages, Conn. Judge Told

    A telecommunications company's confusion about bankruptcy law played a key role in the disintegration of a contract for Los Angeles telephone switching equipment and related telecom services, a company seeking $56 million told a Connecticut state judge on Wednesday as a bench trial kicked off in the 14-year-old case.

  • February 14, 2024

    What's Left Of Judge Newman's DC Suit Likely Won't Go Far

    A D.C. federal judge may be allowing suspended U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman to pursue a handful of arguments over the constitutionality of the Judicial Conduct and Disability Act, but attorneys told Law360 they aren't convinced those claims will fare any better than those already dismissed by the court.

Expert Analysis

  • Twitter Sanction Highlights Privacy Law's Complexity

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent decision to uphold a sanction against X Corp., formerly known as Twitter, for failing to produce account records in response to a subpoena highlights the importance of understanding the Stored Communications Act, particularly when deciding to produce or not produce data, says Cary Aronovitz at Holland & Knight.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

  • Nev. Insurance Law May Mean Turmoil In Liability Market

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    Nevada's new law prohibiting insurers from issuing or renewing defense-within-limits liability policies in the state could cause professional liability insurers to withdraw certain products or prohibitively increase premiums — and while an emergency regulation allows for exceptions, the situation remains fluid, says Joshua Leach at Atheria Law.

  • Lessons From High-Profile Witness Tampering Allegations

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    As demonstrated by recent developments in the cases against former President Donald Trump and FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried, allegations of witness tampering can carry serious consequences — but attorneys can employ certain strategies to mitigate the risk that accusations arise, says Kenneth Notter at MoloLamken.

  • Covington Ruling Strengthens SEC's Enforcement Powers

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    A Washington, D.C., federal court’s recent order that Covington & Burling provide the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission with the identities of its clients in response to a subpoena reinforces the agency’s broad authority to investigate cybersecurity violations, and suggests law firms must take steps to strengthen data privacy, say Elisha Kobre and Ryan Dean at Bradley Arant.

  • 'Blind Side' Family Case Is A Cautionary Tale For Attorneys

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    Former NFL player Michael Oher's recent allegations against Sean and Leigh Anne Tuohy that they never legally adopted him and tricked him into conservatorship — which paint a very different picture than the 2009 film "The Blind Side" — demonstrate the importance of attorney due diligence and safeguards against abuse of process, says Roland Weekley at Smith Gambrell.

  • The Basics Of Being A Knowledge Management Attorney

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Michael Lehet at Ogletree Deakins discusses the role of knowledge management attorneys at law firms, the common tasks they perform and practical tips for lawyers who may be considering becoming one.

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