Legal Ethics

  • February 20, 2024

    Law Firm Wins Unredacted Deal Info In NJ Malpractice Fight

    A law firm has prevailed in a discovery battle against a sibling duo suing it for malpractice in New Jersey state court with a ruling that the plaintiffs must provide unredacted info about the settlement they reached in the underlying suit that the firm allegedly mishandled for them.

  • February 20, 2024

    Alito 'Concerned' Jurors Can Be Axed For Religious Beliefs

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito said Tuesday he is "concerned" about the prospect of potential jurors being dismissed because of their religious beliefs, as the justices declined to hear a case in which Christian jurors were excused over their views on homosexuality.

  • February 20, 2024

    Posner Says Ex-Staffer's 'Lies' Warrant Harsh Sanctions

    Retired Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner is asking an Indiana federal judge to impose "the most severe sanctions" against a noted pro se litigant who claims Posner reneged on a promise to pay him to run a short-lived pro bono services organization, saying the man has repeatedly lied during litigation and improperly accused opposing counsel of perjury.

  • February 20, 2024

    No Coverage For Firm In Haiti Malpractice Suit, Insurer Says

    An insurance company has asked a Washington federal court to declare it does not have to cover a Seattle law firm facing a $31 million New York federal malpractice case stemming from its representation of a Haitian agency in a petroleum contract arbitration, arguing the firm breached the insurance agreement by lying on its application.

  • February 20, 2024

    NC Panel Reverses Suspension For Atty Accused Of Lying

    A North Carolina personal injury attorney on Tuesday succeeded in reversing a one-year suspension of his license after a state appellate panel ruled the State Bar failed to show he intentionally lied about discussing a fellow attorney's personal life with a client.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Denies Review Of Wrestler Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a petition from an attorney seeking to vacate a $312,000 sanctions order over his representation of former wrestlers over brain injuries they suffered while working for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Declines To Review Trump Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to review onetime Trump lawyer Sidney Powell's and six other attorneys' claims that they were wrongly sanctioned and referred for bar discipline for filing a frivolous challenge to Michigan's 2020 presidential election results.

  • February 17, 2024

    Suspended Pa. Judge Charged With Shooting Ex-Boyfriend

    A Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, magisterial judge already suspended for alleged ethics violations has been charged with attempted murder and aggravated assault for allegedly shooting her ex-boyfriend in the head while he slept, police and prosecutors said.

  • February 16, 2024

    Atty Convicted Of $5.5M Client Theft Asks 9th Circ. To Vacate

    The prosecution of a former California personal injury attorney sent to jail for 12 years for embezzling as much as $5.5 million in clients' settlement money was riddled with error, and his conviction and sentence should be vacated, his counsel told the Ninth Circuit at a hearing Friday.

  • February 16, 2024

    Drugs, Sex, Antisemitism Top Complaint Against Calif. Judge

    A California state judge is facing an ethics complaint that accuses him of using a cannabis oil vape pen, pantomiming "something similar to a lap dance" on a woman married to a local public defender and repeatedly calling another public defender an antisemitic slur during a camping trip.

  • February 16, 2024

    Mayer Brown Denies Knowing Of 'Disturbing' Flint PR Effort

    A Mayer Brown LLP partner representing Veolia North America, the water engineering firm facing negligence claims from children exposed to lead in Flint, Michigan, told a Michigan federal judge Friday that his team didn't know about Veolia's public relations campaign disparaging the children's counsel, a campaign the judge labeled a "disturbing development."

  • February 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives Comcast Patent Case, And Warns Its Atty

    The Federal Circuit on Friday revived a patent suit against Comcast over voice recognition technology, finding that a lower court misinterpreted the patents, and reprimanded a Comcast attorney from Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP for exceeding word counts in a brief in a related case.

  • February 16, 2024

    Giuliani's Retrial Bid Stuck In Fight Over Representation

    Rudy Giuliani has still not sought a new trial in his $148 million defamation case, even though a New York bankruptcy judge said nearly a month ago that he would sign off on the request, as his case has become mired in spats over disclosures and who will pay for the former mayor's special counsel.

  • February 16, 2024

    Workday Deputy GC Wants Atty's Bias Suit Tossed

    A deputy general counsel for Workday urged a California federal court to dismiss her from a Black former subordinate's claims of harassment, retaliation and discrimination, arguing that the Maryland-based worker was improperly seeking the protection of California state laws.

  • February 16, 2024

    Quinn Emanuel Can't Collect On LA County's $280K Legal Bill

    A Los Angeles judge on Friday dismissed Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan LLP's lawsuit seeking to collect more than $280,000 in legal bills from Los Angeles County, saying the claims should have been filed in a counter-suit after the defendants sued the firm several years ago.

  • February 16, 2024

    Switchblade Seller Sues Atty Over Police Raid Advice

    An online switchblade seller in Colorado has accused his former attorney of failing to tell him he could sue the government to try to recover inventory taken during a law enforcement raid involving state and federal authorities.

  • February 16, 2024

    Atlanta Atty In YSL RICO Case Arrested On Gang Charges

    An Atlanta defense attorney for a man originally charged as a co-defendant in the racketeering case against rapper Young Thug was arrested Friday on charges that she tipped off a suspect about an arrest warrant against him in an unrelated shooting, the Atlanta Police Department confirmed.

  • February 16, 2024

    Texas Justices Ax ADA's Defamation Suit Against Newspaper

    The Texas Supreme Court on Friday reversed a state appellate decision in a case involving a small-town newspaper, an infamous wrongful conviction and a publicly snubbed assistant district attorney, ruling that the case should have been dismissed and that the Polk County Publishing Co.'s characterization of the assistant DA was legal.

  • February 16, 2024

    Ex-Ohio Judge Indefinitely Suspended For Felony Convictions

    The Ohio Supreme Court indefinitely suspended a former judge for the Buckeye State's Marion County Court of Common Pleas Friday, after he was convicted on two felony counts arising from a car crash that occurred while he was still on the bench.

  • February 16, 2024

    Kwok Trustee Files RICO Claims As Judge Extends Deadlines

    Alleging bankruptcy fraud, money laundering and other claims, the Chapter 11 trustee overseeing the $374 million bankruptcy of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok has filed a civil Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations complaint against Kwok's relatives, his onetime attorney and others, including two companies connected to Donald Trump aides.

  • February 16, 2024

    NY AG Tells Firm To Stop Misleading Uber, Lyft Drivers

    New York Attorney General Letitia James' office put a New York City law firm on notice Friday, warning in a cease-and-desist letter that the firm must immediately stop proffering unnecessary legal services to "help" Uber and Lyft drivers secure funds, for a fee, stemming from a November New York Labor Law settlement.

  • February 16, 2024

    Baker Donelson Won't Owe Profits To Ponzi Scheme Victims

    A Mississippi federal judge has limited certain damages Baker Donelson Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz PC may have to pay in a federal receiver's suit claiming the firm allowed a Ponzi scheme to unfold in one of its offices, but left the door open for other types of damages.

  • February 16, 2024

    Client Says NJ Atty's Math Error Cost Him $276K In Divorce

    A New Jersey lawyer and his firm have been hit with a malpractice complaint in state court alleging a mathematical error deprived their former client of around $276,000 in his divorce settlement.

  • February 16, 2024

    Paxton Prosecutor Steps Down After Row Over Pretrial Deal

    One of two appointed prosecutors overseeing a securities fraud case against Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton told a state court judge Friday that he is stepping down from the case, citing a disagreement over whether the state's chief legal officer should be allowed to resolve the charges through pretrial intervention.

  • February 16, 2024

    No Coverage For Conn. Firm's Malpractice Fight, Insurer Says

    The law firm Evans & Lewis LLC and partner Douglas J. Lewis should lose a breach of contract suit against their malpractice carrier because they were already in the early stages of battling a professional misconduct claim when the relevant policy went into effect, the insurer told the Connecticut Superior Court in seeking summary judgment.

Expert Analysis

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Noncompetes Hold Atty Privilege Pitfalls For Health Industry

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    Providers negotiating with medical professionals bound by enforceable restrictive covenants must tread carefully due to not only risk of breaching physicians' covenants but also risk of wrongful conduct that pierces attorney-client privilege, says Scott O'Connell at Holland & Knight.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Opinion

    Guardrails Needed Against Politically Motivated Atty Discipline

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    As illustrated by revelations about disbarred attorney Tom Girardi’s influence, there is a need to revamp attorney discipline to protect the public, but any reforms to misconduct rules must also consider how bar-directed disciplinary hearings are increasingly used as a political weapon, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Groundbreaking Nev. Law May Alter Insurance Landscape

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    The Nevada Legislature recently passed a law prohibiting insurers from issuing liability policies with eroding limits provisions that has the potential to create massive shifts in the marketplace — and specifically in areas like professional liability, cyber, and directors and officers insurance, says Will Bennett at Saxe Doernberger.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Durham Hearing Shows Common Cross-Examination Errors

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    Trial attorneys can glean several key cross-examination lessons from the mistakes made by several members of the U.S. House of Representatives during a recent hearing on special counsel John Durham’s FBI probe, say Luke Andrews and Asha Laskar at Poole Huffman.

  • Opinion

    When Corporate Self-Disclosure Threatens Individuals' Rights

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    The prosecution of former Cognizant executives in New Jersey federal court demonstrates how the U.S. Department of Justice’s corporate enforcement policy can contravene the constitutional rights of individual defendants who are employed by cooperating companies, says Gideon Mark at the University of Maryland.

  • Pitfalls Of Attorney AI Use In Brief Prep Has Judges On Alert

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    Some lawyers are attempting to leverage generative artificial intelligence as a brief drafting tool, which may serve to greatly reduce the burden of motion practice, but several recent cases show that generative AI is not perfect and blind reliance on this tool can be very risky, say Matthew Nigriny and John Gary Maynard at Hunton.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • Insurance Coverage For ChatGPT Legal Fiasco: A Hypothetical

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    William Passannante at Anderson Kill draws on the recent case of an attorney sanctioned by the Southern District of New York for submitting a ChatGPT-authored brief to discuss what the insurance coverage for the attorney's hypothetical claim might look like.

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